Fantasy

This week for a bedtime story my son and I read Rocks and Minerals, and I learned everything I know about rocks and minerals from that book. Why wouldn’t the rock with the black spots be called a Dalmatian? I totally buy it. With my daughter I read a book called Forever After which includes four stories about Disney princesses and answers the question that has been lingering on all our minds since the happy couples kissed at the alter and the screen filled with hearts: how did they plan their weddings?

These weddings didn’t just happen sans adversity. Happily ever after might mean compromising by weaving the queen’s pearls into your veil because they are too heavy to wear around your neck, or it might mean surprising your former dog-beast prince by inviting all the villagers to the reception to show that he is loved (now that he isn’t a drooling, maniacal killer). Maybe, if you are the only black princess, it means catering your own wedding by cooking gumbo for all your guests.

I read with skepticism (and occasional eye rolling). I know too much. Usually my voice trails off at the last line of each story, “Cinderella had the wedding of her dreams,” and I close the book, letting out a sigh and putting up my middle finger. I still read her the book, though. I know it is wrong, and I should teach her to be offended, but those tiny-footed princesses make her smile. It is sort of like when a creepy meth addict calls out from behind a garbage can lid, “Nice tits,” and I am outwardly offended, but inwardly quite flattered as I look down and whisper, “Thanks for noticing, man.”  Then the rest of the day I have unrealistically high self-esteem.

Princesses get to be pretty and wear fancy dresses, and they have pure hearts, and they get to use all the animals as their personal servants, and they don’t really have to date. They don’t have to check their phone every thirty seconds to see if he called, when they know damn well that he didn’t because he is too busy boning a peasant. The first guy a princess meets is eternally devoted and devoid of personality, unless he is a monster who imprisons her, or a lying thief, or a womanizing frog, but she can change him. She must. She is stuck with him either way. The end! (Cue the floating, kissing hearts!)

The disney movies with their climax of walking down the aisle are dangerous because they deliver the message that the party trumps the partner and the entire partnership. That idea contributes to the systemic problem of how we market to girls. The Disney dudes are all just versions of Ken with different colored plastic hair. I was not into the princesses as a girl because they were too puritanical for me, but I loved playing with Barbie. Ken was usually just lying on the floor, face down and naked. I liked to do Barbie’s hair, and by “do” I mean that I cut her hair and tried to give her bangs, which never worked, but I kept trying with each new Barbie I received or that was left momentarily unattended by one of my sisters. I also liked to set up Barbie’s house with beds made out of maxi-pads.

For little girls, playing with dolls and watching or reading about princesses is tied up with the fantasy of being an adult. For me, being a big girl was about having killer bangs and a really absorbent bed. I have not made either one of those fantasies a reality. My daughter is fascinated with weddings and brides. Her favorite princess is Ariel, who gives up her voice to be with the man of her dreams-slash-the first and only human she has ever met. She gets her voice back, but then she has to change species in order to get married. I feel like there are some major issues here that I need to address with my daughter. For starters, I will tell her that she should never give up her voice under any circumstances, and second there are plenty of fish in the actual sea. With most major issues I like to ask myself, “Who has the most vested interest in this venture?” If the answer is, “a voluptuous octopus lady,” then maybe she should take it as a sign and gracefully swim away, tail intact.

I still read my daughter the books. I let her adore the princesses, mainly because I know she is smart enough to enjoy them without being consumed. I am going to tell her that if she ever decides to get married, she should consider eloping. Not because it is easier, but because it will be a good barometer for how she feels about the marriage itself. Does she still think it is worth it without the big white gown and party? Maybe even more controversially, I will tell her that she doesn’t have to get married at all. (Gasp! Tiny princess hands rise to cover tiny rosebud mouths. “Mouse! Go get me a paper bag! I need to hyperventilate.”) I will tell her that she doesn’t need to be rescued. I will tell her that she should not have to change herself or the person she loves to find true love. I will also tell her to avoid cursed men who attempt to trap her in a dark, damp castle filled with talking, singing dish ware. Then I will tell her that she is a beautiful princess as I brush her hair with a fork.

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3 comments

  1. Thelma · January 10, 2014

    Thanks Hillary. Now I regret lying to your daughter at the recent wedding. She said “I wonder if they are going to have a baby?” And I replied, maybe some day but you have to be married 2 years first. This from the woman whose daughter was actually in her wedding. You are and do write beautifully.

  2. Cali · January 10, 2014

    SNORT!
    The maxi pad bed!!!! So much weird stuff we used to make barbies super cool house;)
    Love it!

  3. Vitoria Bezerra · December 9, 2015

    Olá jovens, no meu blog falo sobre superação, paixão dolorosa e relatos sobre algumas coisas que aconteceram em minha vida. Vamos lá dá uma olhadinha? Estou esperando..

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